Thursday, September 22, 2011

Typhoon Roke Hits Japan [video]

More than a million people in the central Japanese city of Nagoya were advised to evacuate as Typhoon Roke approached, bringing heavy rain and floods to large parts of western Japan.

18 comments:

  1. this must be because they freed that bachur...

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  2. Of course, Roke means spit, so Hashem is spitting on the Japanese for some reason. Possibly, either b/c they still have one more bahur to free or b/c they're undecided as to whether or not to vote for a Palestinian state.

    Every nation will get their due eventually.

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  3. Really... Roke means to spit?

    Josh will probably roke now you've written that.

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  4. It's pronounced Ro-ki
    That would be "my spit" - right ?

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  5. "Possibly, either b/c they still have one more bahur to free or..."

    it still would not explain the typhoons Japan has regularly experienced for the thousands of years prior to imprisoning the bachurim.

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  6. Correct. Everything for its time.

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  7. yaak:

    sorry, that does not make sense.

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  8. It makes perfect sense.

    Every typhoon is a punishment for a sin done earlier. Every hurricane, tornado, earthquake, etc. too. We may not know the cause, but it's there. We may not understand why certain countries get it while other countries which are seemingly worse do not. That comes with the territory.

    We've been through this before. To call it "nature" is wrong, per the Rambam in Hilchot Ta'anit.

    Not knowing the reasons for things is part of what it says in this week's Perasha - הנסתרות לה' אלקינו. Knowing that there are reasons for things is part of והנגלות לנו ולבנינו עד עולם.

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  9. "Every typhoon is a punishment for a sin done earlier."

    And the ones before Adam HaRishon were also for sins done earlier?

    "To call it "nature" is wrong, per the Rambam in Hilchot Ta'anit."

    With all due respect, besides different ways of understanding that Rambam, and the sources (including the Rambam and Ramban) I could muster in the opposite direction aside from that particular Rambam in Taanis, the Rambam did not know meteorology and plate techtonics.

    But most importantly: one cannot pasken reality in and out of existence.

    "Knowing that there are reasons for things is part of והנגלות לנו ולבנינו עד עולם."

    Yet the error of Iyov's friends was in attributing his suffering to his sins.

    Here is but one example of people who have not sinned being destroyed by dever, as part of the Divine plan. Yerushalmi Yevamos 49b:

    דאמר רבי חנינה אחת לששים ולשבעים שנה הקדוש ברוך הוא מביא דבר בעולם ומכלה ממזיריהן ונוטל את הכשירין עמהן שלא לפרסם את חטאיהן. ואייתינה כיי דמר רבי לוי בשם רבי שמעון בן לקיש (ויקרא ו) במקום אשר תשחט העולה תשחט החטאת לפני ה'. שלא לפרסם את החטאים.

    (And yes, I can anticipate your response, and we can have a back and forth. Note that a mamzer did not himself sin; and that the non-mamzerim are killed along with them.)

    Was the famine in the days of Yaakov punishment for the sins of the people of that area? Or was it part of the Divine plan to bring the Bnei Yisrael down to Egypt for their servitude?

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  10. Re: Iyov, Iyov was a special case, if he existed at all.

    Re: Yerushalmi in Yevamot, I'll leave you with my anticipated response. :-)

    Was the famine in the days of Yaakov punishment for the sins of the people of that area? Or was it part of the Divine plan to bring the Bnei Yisrael down to Egypt for their servitude?
    It seems to me that it was both. Killing 2 birds with one stone.

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  11. "Rambam did not know meteorology and plate techtonics."

    Hashem is meteorology and plate techtonics."

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  12. If Iyov was a special case, unlike any every seen before and ever seen hence, why were the friends to blame?

    If Iyov did not exist, the purpose is to explore why bad things happen to people. And that lesson still stands, and there is a lesson is the Divine criticism of Iyov's friends.

    In terms of Yerushalmi, know that this is but one example.

    In terms of the famine, I see no scriptural / rabbinic basis for this.

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  13. It might be because of bochurim, but if I had to bet, I would say it's because the Japanese have gotten to close to the Iranian madman in the past year. I'm surprised no one is talking about that. Also, Japan made a deal with Jordan to help them with a nuclear reactor as well.

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  14. The Japanese are infamous for their torture of prisoners of war, indeed you only need to look at the reports from the Japanese jails today to see that torture is alive and well in Japan.

    And ever since March this year, the entire country of Japan has been undergoing a form of torture. How many of the Japanese people are still holed up in emergency shelters, prisoners in their own country?

    It's just sad that the innocent have to suffer as well, but that's how it goes down here.

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  15. And don't get me started on what they do to whales....

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  16. I'm changing my stance a bit.
    Thank you Josh!

    It's not always in the category of punishment. Sometimes, it's in the category of Yisurim. It's never in the category of just plain "nature" ח"ו.

    The famines and Iyyov are in this category of Yissurim.

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  17. The Japanese plundered and raped lots of nations - China (I'm sure you've probably heard of the book , The Rape of Nanking), Korea, the Philippines. When I was in Korea all you had to do was mention Japan to most Koreans and they will gladly tell you why they hate them. On top of everything they are idol worshipers.

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