Tuesday, September 1, 2015

The Gate of Tears



by Rabbi David Pinto Shlita 

It is written, “Because you did not serve Hashem your G-d amid joy and goodness of heart” [Ki Tavo 28:47].

Rabbi Yossi said, “It is written: ‘Serve Hashem with joy, come before Him with joyous song’ [Tehillim 100:2], for in His service there is no room for sadness. It may be asked: What if a man is deep in sorrow and tribulation, and has no heart to rejoice, and yet his trouble forces him to seek compassion from the Heavenly King? Should he refrain from praying on account of his sorrow? What can he do? He cannot help being heavy-hearted!

The answer is, ‘All gates have been closed since the destruction of the Temple, but the gate of tears has not been closed’ – and tears are an expression of sadness and sorrow. The celestial beings appointed over the gate of tears break down all the iron locks and bars, and let these tears pass through. The prayers of the afflicted penetrate and reach the holy King…. Thus the prayers of the afflicted person do not return to him empty, and the Holy One takes pity on him. Blessed is the man who in his prayers sheds tears before the Holy One.”

– Zohar II:165ab

3 comments:

CKHL said...

The Jewish people have collectively completed and accomplished all the tshuva necessary.
All that remains is for Hashem to allow for Moshiach to be revealed.
May that happen immediately!

Unknown said...

Thanks, but I am not a Tzaddik and will take Elul, Selichos & the High Holidays seriously. There is ample room for more Teshuvah.

michael said...

sometimes on cannot help but cry. see this http://dafyomireview.com/441 one of the saddest stories i ever read